The desire to quell her grandmother’s pain as she battled both baldder cancer and lymphoma urged Marianne Stanley to transition to oncology massage treatments after finishing basic massage training at the Professional Massage Training Center in Springfield, Missouri. Since that time, Stanley has developed a passion for working with cancer patients and has continued to do so two years running. Relizing the extra work it took to massage cancer patients Stanley began research and study at The Peregrine Institute of Oncology Massage Training in Santa Fe, New Mexico.
Stanley understands that cancer patients are not getting massages to unknot tight muscles, they must be nurished and relaxed and are prone to swelling and brusing. In fact, the cancer patient should consult their doctor before recieving a massage. But if permission is granted their can be numerous benefits, such as improved sleep, decreses in aches and nausea as well as in stress levels and anxiety.
Stanley voices that is at times very emotionaly trying to work with cancer patients and urges massage therapists doing so to create outlets to express how they are feeling, such as though dance, art, or journaling. (Rao, News-Leader, 6/23)

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