Massage therapy has been found to effect relaxation, relieve stress, and lower high blood pressure. The National Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Oct. 27 released a national report on the prevalence and control of high blood pressure in the U.S.

Among the findings:

• There was no significant change in the prevalence of high blood pressure among U.S. adults from 1999–2000 to 2007–2008. This was true for men and women, all age groups, and for non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Mexican-American adults.

• Among U.S. adults with high blood pressure, the percentage that was aware of the condition increased from 69.6 percent in 1999-2000 to 80.6 percent in 2007-2008.

• Among U.S. adults with high blood pressure, the percentage who were taking medication to lower their blood pressure increased from 1999–2000 through 2007-2008.

• The control of blood pressure increased among U.S. adults with high blood pressure from 1999–2000 through 2007–2008. Increases in control occurred for all subgroups of the population.

“Overall, the prevalence of high blood pressure among U.S. adults did not change over the last decade (1999–2008),” the report noted. “However, there have been significant increases in high blood pressure awareness, treatment, and control among persons with high blood pressure over this same time period.”

—Source: NCHS Data Brief No. 48, October 2010.

Related articles:
High Blood Pressure Reduced by Massage Therapy

Massage Therapy Shown to Reduce Stress, Enhance Well-being

Moderate-Pressure Massage Increases Relaxation

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