From the MASSAGE Magazine article titled, “Cryotherapy: Harness the Power of Cold to Address Pain and Inflammation,” in the August 2008 issue. Article summary: The application of cold helps decrease the pain cycle, and it also reduces edema and scar tissue. From ice packs and cold stones, wraps and topical analgesics, to chemical cold packs, patches and vapocoolant sprays, today’s massage therapists have access to an unprecedented array of cryotherapy tools.

Numerous aspects of cryotherapy have been studied. To access or purchase research studies, click on the links below.

• “Influence of cold-water immersion on indices of muscle damage following prolonged intermittent shuttle running”
Journal of Sports Sciences, 2007
www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~content=a780725819~db=all

• “Does Cryotherapy Improve Outcomes With Soft Tissue Injury?”
Journal of Athletic Training, 2004
www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=522152

• “Effects of cold water immersion on the symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage”
Journal of Sports Sciences, 1999
www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~content=a713776107~db=all

• “Effect of cryotherapy on muscle soreness and strength following eccentric exercise”
International Journal of Sports Medicine, 1997 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9443590

• “Cryotherapy in sports medicine”
Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 1996
www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1600-0838.1996.tb00090.x

• “The Effect of Cryotherapy on Intraarticular Temperature and Postoperative Care After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction”
The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 1999
http://ajsm.highwire.org/cgi/content/abstract/27/3/357

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