The Correlation between Therapeutic Massage and Life Expectancy

(PRLEAP.COM) Pflugerville, Texas; January 6, 2009 – An actuarial analysis performed by Medical Massage Care indicates that therapeutic massage tends to increase life expectancy. There is a positive correlation between the number of massage therapists per 1,000 residents of a state and the life expectancy for that state. As the number of massage therapists per resident increases, the life expectancy tends to increase.

Hawaii is the state with the greatest number of massage therapists per resident and is the state with the greatest life expectancy as well. Utah and Colorado also place in the top ten in both categories. The states with the lowest concentrations of massage therapists tend to have the lowest life expectancies. Louisiana, Kentucky, Georgia, Mississippi, and Alabama all place in the bottom ten for both number of massage therapists and life expectancy.

Therapeutic massage increases life expectancy as a result of the positive physiological effects of soft tissue manipulation. The effects of massage on the muscular system include allowing more flexibility, the prevention of stiffness and soreness of muscles, and the removal of metabolic waste. The effects of massage on the cardiovascular system include increasing blood cell counts, increasing stroke volume, and decreasing the heart and pulse rate.

The effects on the nervous system include reductions in pain, stress, and anxiety. Massage also improves the function of the lymphatic system. Other factors besides the concentration of massage therapists, such as age, gender, smoking, marital status, body mass index, type of employment, education and income level as well as differences in health behavior, are significant in explaining differences in life expectancy. For additional information on the actuarial analysis, contact Philip Martin McCaulay.

Philip Martin McCaulay, FSA, FCA, MAAA, EA, writes and publishes study aids for massage therapy licensing and certification examinations, including Medical Massage Care’s Therapeutic Massage National FSMTB Massage & Bodywork Licensing Examination MBLEx Practice Exams, Medical Massage Care’s Therapeutic Massage National FSMTB Massage & Bodywork Licensing Examination MBLEx Study Guide, Medical Massage Care’s Therapeutic Massage National Certification Practice Exams 2008 Edition, and Medical Massage Care’s Therapeutic Massage National Certification Exam Study Guide. A graduate of Bodymechanics School of Myotherapy and Massage in Olympia, Washington, with a B.A. in Mathematics from Indiana University, he is a Fellow of the Society of Actuaries (FSA), a Fellow of the Conference of Consulting Actuaries (FCA), a Member of the American Academy of Actuaries (MAAA), and an Enrolled Actuary (EA). Martin serves on the Education and Examination Committee of the Society of Actuaries.

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