LAS VEGAS, April 29 /PRNewswire/ — A billion people will share the U.S. sometime between 2100 and 2120, in a lifetime more than tripling the current population. That prediction is according to Dr. Arthur C. Nelson who will present his findings this morning (Pacific) at the American Planning Association's (APA) 100th National Planning Conference, taking place in Las Vegas.

This is thought to be the first time a planning scholar or professional has predicted that it is even possible that the U.S. will reach the 1 billion mark. In fact, it appears that there have been no significant published discussions of the possibility. Nelson says that with increasing longevity, even some people in their early 20s now could be alive to see the billionth person arrive.

     WHO:  Dr. Arthur C. Nelson, FAICP, Professor in Urban Affairs and           Planning, and Co-Director of the Metropolitan Institute at Virginia           Tech. Dr. Nelson is an expert in estimating population changes and           their impact on planning and economic development.            Dr. Robert E. Lang, Associate Professor in Urban Affairs and           Planning, and Co-Director of the Metropolitan Institute at Virginia           Tech, providing an alternate view.            Jeff Soule, FAICP, APA's Director of Outreach and International           Programs, providing APA's view.      WHAT: Media Briefing via Conference Call      WHEN: Tuesday, April 29, 11 to 11:30 PM (PACIFIC TIME)      Dial In: US/Canada Dial-in #: (800) 482-8912              Conference ID: 45148279      APA Contact: Roberta Rewers 312.786.6395 or 708-302-9232      Full news release: http://planning.org/news/media/ 

The American Planning Association and its professional institute, the American Institute of Certified Planners, are dedicated to advancing the art, science and profession of good planning-physical, economic and social-so as to create communities that offer better choices for where and how people work and live. For more information, visit the website at www.planning.org .

SOURCE American Planning Association

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