Acupressure, targeted pressure used by many massage therapists in sessions, has been found to alleviate opioid-induced nausea and accelerate the recovery of patients who are using patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) post-surgery, according to new research.

“Nei-Guan acupressure is recommended for nursing practice as a way for alleviating the opioid-induced nausea and accelerating the recovery of patients who are using PCA after surgery,” the Korean researchers noted. The research was conducted at the College of Nursing, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea, according to a report published on www.pubmed.gov.

This study was done to examine effects of Nei-Guan acupressure on nausea, vomiting and level of satisfaction for gynecological surgery patients who were using a patient-controlled analgesia, the report noted.

Fifty-one patients were assigned to one of three groups, a control group (17 patients), experimental group 1 (finger acupressure group) (17 patients), and experimental group 2 (relief band group) (17 patients), the report noted.

The occurrence of nausea between the experimental group with Nei-Guan acupressure treatment and the control group was different. However, there was no difference in nausea and vomiting control or level of patient satisfaction between the finger acupressure group and the relief band group.

“Effects of nei-guan acupressure on nausea, vomiting and level of satisfaction for gynecological surgery patients who are using a patient-controlled analgesia” ran in the Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing‘s June 2010 issue.

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